Difference between revisions of "Brexit"

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"Brexit" is a word coined to refer to the process of Britain leaving the European Union. Whether the country will leave or stay is to be decided at a referendum to be held on June 23, 2016 in Britain.
 
"Brexit" is a word coined to refer to the process of Britain leaving the European Union. Whether the country will leave or stay is to be decided at a referendum to be held on June 23, 2016 in Britain.
  
Reasons in favor of leaving include that the European Union has become larger and more bureaucratic over the past four decades and has diminished British influence and sovereignty. Immigration is also an important issue to the "leave" camp. <ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/world/europe/britain-european-union-brexit.html?_r=0|name=‘Brexit’: Explaining Britain’s Vote on European Union Membership|org=The New York Times|date=June 17, 2016}}</ref>
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Reasons in favor of leaving include that the European Union has become larger and more bureaucratic over the past four decades and has diminished British influence and sovereignty. Immigration is also a key issue to the "leave" camp. <ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/world/europe/britain-european-union-brexit.html?_r=0|name=‘Brexit’: Explaining Britain’s Vote on European Union Membership|org=The New York Times|date=June 17, 2016}}</ref>
  
Reasons to stay include the economic cost of leaving, which some economists belief would cut growth, weaken the pound and diminish the City of London as a financial center.  
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Reasons to stay include the economic cost of leaving, which some economists belief would cut growth, weaken the pound and diminish the City of London as a financial center. Car manufacturers have warned that a vote to leave would risk jobs in the industry.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/20/sayeeda-warsi-quits-leave-campaign-over-hateful-xenophobic-tactics|name=Sayeeda Warsi quits leave campaign over 'hateful, xenophobic' tactics|org=The Guardian|date=June 20, 2016}}</ref>
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Directors at Toyota UK, Vauxhall, Jaguar Land Rover and BMW, as well as from component makers GKN and Magal Engineering, also backed the remain campaign.  
  
 
Prime Minister David Cameron leads the "remain" camp, and most of the Conservative government, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party. Cameron promised a Brexit in the Conservative Party manifesto for the May 2015 election.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.economist.com/sites/default/files/EconomistBrexitBriefs16.pdf|name=Economist Brexit Briefs: The roots of Euroscepticism|org=The Economist|date=June 20, 2016}}</ref>
 
Prime Minister David Cameron leads the "remain" camp, and most of the Conservative government, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party. Cameron promised a Brexit in the Conservative Party manifesto for the May 2015 election.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.economist.com/sites/default/files/EconomistBrexitBriefs16.pdf|name=Economist Brexit Briefs: The roots of Euroscepticism|org=The Economist|date=June 20, 2016}}</ref>

Revision as of 07:30, 20 June 2016

"Brexit" is a word coined to refer to the process of Britain leaving the European Union. Whether the country will leave or stay is to be decided at a referendum to be held on June 23, 2016 in Britain.

Reasons in favor of leaving include that the European Union has become larger and more bureaucratic over the past four decades and has diminished British influence and sovereignty. Immigration is also a key issue to the "leave" camp. [1]

Reasons to stay include the economic cost of leaving, which some economists belief would cut growth, weaken the pound and diminish the City of London as a financial center. Car manufacturers have warned that a vote to leave would risk jobs in the industry.[2]

Directors at Toyota UK, Vauxhall, Jaguar Land Rover and BMW, as well as from component makers GKN and Magal Engineering, also backed the remain campaign.

Prime Minister David Cameron leads the "remain" camp, and most of the Conservative government, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party. Cameron promised a Brexit in the Conservative Party manifesto for the May 2015 election.[3]

The “leave” camp is led by Michael Gove, the justice minister, and Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London. Nearly half the Conservative members of Parliament favor leaving, as do the members of the UK Independence Party, or UKIP, and its leader, Nigel Farage.

History

Britain first joined what was then called the European Economic Community (formed in 1957) in 1973.


References

  1. ‘Brexit’: Explaining Britain’s Vote on European Union Membership. The New York Times.
  2. Sayeeda Warsi quits leave campaign over 'hateful, xenophobic' tactics. The Guardian.
  3. Economist Brexit Briefs: The roots of Euroscepticism. The Economist.